Do Strong Relationships Bring Financial Stability?

Well-being and financial security

A recent survey of more than 85,000 Americans by Gallup and Healthways returned some interesting results: Americans today are more likely to be considered thriving in their social well-being and suffering in their financial well-being, as measured by the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index

The good news? Forty-one percent of us have supportive relationships and love in our lives.

The not-so-good news? Twenty-three percent of us are struggling to make ends meet and have a stable economical life.

Is it all those date-nights out and brunches with friends that are impacting our standard of living, ability to afford basic necessities and financial worry?

Additionally, the study found that well-being differed by age, gender and geographic region. Some generalities have emerged: Americans aged 65 or older are more likely than younger adults to be thriving in each of the five elements of well-being, and the percentage of women who are thriving eclipsed men who are thriving in all elements except financial well-being, where they are about the same.

There are some regional differences, as well: Southerners have an edge over those living in all other regions in terms of the percent who are thriving in three of the five elements: purpose, social, and community well-being. Westerners are the most likely to thrive in physical well-being. Midwesterners and westerners essentially tie as highest on financial well-being.

Read up on the study’s interesting results, and then complete the free Gallup-Healthways Well-Being 5™ assessment of your own well-being to see where you stand. The results just might surprise you.

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